Posts Tagged: media relations

Five tips for creating an online newsroom

According to a recent survey, more than 50 percent of journalists visit online newsroom sections of organizations’ websites at least once a week. What are they looking to find in the online newsroom? More than news releases. The online newsroom should serve as an organization’s online filing cabinet with news releases, company information and digital assets readily available, including:
  • news releases;
  • visual assets like photographs (including key leaders’ headshots in print-quality resolutions) and video;
  • succinct information about products and services;
  • biographies of key executives;
  • media contacts, including cell phone numbers;
  • financial statements.
Smart PR professionals are now thinking about online newsrooms as a full section of a website, rather than just a single newsroom page.

Five tips to take your client’s online newsroom to the next level:

1) Filters: ... ⇢ read more

It’s Our Job to be Appreciated by Media

Barb Harris and Sharon Kreher, teamworks communication management, www.teamworkspr.com I read a fair amount of Facebook group and media blog chatter about the love/hate relationship media folks have with PR people. At best, they begrudgingly acknowledge that sometimes PR people can occasionally be helpful. But as most public forums are inclined, complaints about PR folks tend to dominate these conversations. As a PR professional, it’s difficult to reply to or refute these attitudes, as that can fly in the face of our goal of fostering good working relationships with members of the media for the benefit of our clients. ch-5-still-shotInstead, let me tell you about a recent media experience and you can draw your own conclusions. My firm works to place stories about the good work ... ⇢ read more

Another Day, Another Blog Post….How Do I Get Inspired?

online-pr-cartoonBy Brendy Barr, Brendy Barr Communications So it’s my turn to write a blog post for PRCG Powerlines and I’m having an attack of writer’s block.  Know the feeling? It’s time to turn to my Top 10 sources for content inspiration. Perhaps one of them is your favorite muse? 1.    Turn on CNN, or FOX News or any national news channel. See what stories are breaking relevant to your industry that you can offer an opinion about.  2.   Subscribe to e-newsletters and RSS feeds distributed by industry associations and peruse them for content that interests you. Re-post content with a brief introduction of why it amuses you. Be sure to credit your ... ⇢ read more

All Politics is Local, or, Is it Great PR

by Brenda Jones Barwick, APR

Jones Public Relations, Inc.

We’ve all heard the cliché, All Politics is Local.  Coined by former U.S. Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill to encapsulate the principle that a politician's success is directly tied to his ability to understand and influence the issues of his constituents.

In many ways, political campaigns is a microcosm of public relations.  Every candidate has a story to tell and aims to persuade a 50%-plus-one target audience to act by voting for the candidate on election day.

Electoral campaigns have a goal and deadline -- to win on election day -- and a plan with measurable objectives, defined audiences, developed message points.  All of these campaign elements are continually evaluated at various stages, such as po ... ⇢ read more

You said WHAT? To WHOM?

By Deb Trivitt, Trivitt PR Aye, aye, aye! When will they ever learn? Another supposed PR professional (I take that back) a political spokesperson with Mitt Romney’s campaign told a reporter in Poland to “kiss my a**” and to “shove it”. Is that any way to talk to a reporter? Surely Rick Gorka knew that the microphone was on, that what he said would be “on the record," that he’d have to apologize and/or look for a new job. Why are these lessons so hard to learn? We should all learn from our Olympic athletes. Support our team members (and yes, I consider journalists members of MY team, because they help me tell my clients’ stories) and support them even if they outrace, outscore and outsmart you. Congratulate them and move on. You won’t win the shouting match. You’ll just look, well, dumb. ... ⇢ read more